Sunday, January 15, 2017

My Weekly Diigo Bookmarks (January 17, 2017)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Sunday, January 8, 2017

My Weekly Diigo Bookmarks (January 8, 2017)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Sunday, January 1, 2017

My Weekly Diigo Bookmarks (January 1, 2017)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Sunday, December 25, 2016

My Weekly Diigo Bookmarks (December 25, 2017)


  • However, instead of making the trek over to Finland there is somewhere much closer and within the U.S. we can visit. Educators, researchers and leaders could make a pilgrimage to the great state of Massachusetts, because they ranked as highly as Finland in the current PISA results. More than 70 countries take part in PISA, and Massachusetts ranks among the top.
    • U.S. we can visit. Educators, researchers and leaders could make a pilgrimage to the great state of Massachusetts, because they ranked as highly as Finland in the current PISA results. More than 70 countries take part in PISA, and Massachusetts ranks among the top.
  • Many people are tempted to download videos from YouTube to show them in classrooms where YouTube is blocked. According to YouTube's terms of use, you're not supposed to download unless you see a download link, in order to protect video creators’ rights, so you may not want to take this route. The good news is that YouTube now offers Creative Commons-licensed videos, which are automatically safe to use. You can even modify or edit them into your own videos using the YouTube Video Editor. Enter specific keywords into YouTube’s main search bar as you normally would (“biology lectures,” for instance), then click on the “Filter & Explore” tab to the far left. In the middle of the drop-down list are the words “creative commons.” Click here and all the videos that appear under your search term will be Creative-Commons licensed. If the content you’re interested in doesn’t come with a Creative Commons tag, it helps to know that the fair use clause in the Copyright Law of the United States allows the use of works without permission for teaching. Still, the user must adhere to some key regulations that can be vague and confusing.
Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Monday, December 19, 2016

Three Great Resources To Help Students Fight Off Fake News


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In my previous post on the topic of Fake News, I mentioned that Fake News is nothing new. There have always been individuals and organizations that have tried to influence people by presenting them with stories that stray from the truth. While these stories vary in the degree of factual information they contain, the more important question regards the ability of the reader to delve into these articles and blog posts and pull out where things veer from fact to fiction.  The National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) highlights the following skills for students in its 21st Century Literacies Framework:
  • Students in the 21st century must be able to take information from multiple places and in a variety of different formats, determine its reliability, and create new knowledge from that information.
  • Students in the 21st century must be critical consumers and creators of multimedia texts.
In order to attain these skills, teachers are encouraged to reflect on the following questions:
  • Do students analyze the credibility of information and its appropriateness in meeting their needs?
  • Do students use information to make decisions as informed citizens?
  • Do students strive to see limitations and overlaps between multiple streams of information?
  • Do students analyze and evaluate the multimedia sources that they use?
While the bulleted items above are just an abridged look at the skills and questions that are outlined in NCTE's Framework 21st Century Literacies Framework, an equally important issue is in regards to the resources that are available for students to utilize to determine the credibility of sources of information that they come across. The resources below are a few of the ones that I have come across to help support students in this complicated task:
  1. Truth, truthiness, triangulation: A news literacy toolkit for a "post-truth" world  - (A great post from Joyce Valenza on School Library Journal's Website)
  2. FAKE NEWS vs. REAL NEWS: How to Determine the Reliability of Sources - (Website from Northern Essex Community College

Sunday, December 18, 2016

Thursday, December 15, 2016

Burlington One of 12 Catalyst School Districts for MA Personalized Learning EdTech Consortium (MAPLE)

Burlington Public Schools is proud to be one of 12 school districts in Massachusetts that are catalyst school districts in the MAPLE Consortium, a public/private consortium created to catalyze personalized learning in schools across the state.

The consortium, which was created by LearnLaunch Institute and the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education launched yesterday at Natick High School with an event featuring MA Commissioner of Education Mitchell Chester. Commissioner Chester outlined the motivation behind this initiative as follows:
“While proud of how Massachusetts schools perform when compared to other states, we need to enable success for all students, preparing them to compete globally in the 21st Century. This requires fostering and accelerating the rate of adoption of effective practices in teaching and learning,” said Mitchell Chester, Massachusetts commissioner of elementary and secondary education. “The MAPLE Consortium is a collaborative effort with local school districts to identify, analyze, and nurture successful new models of personalized learning and then catalyze and support the expansion of these models and practices across the Commonwealth.”
The entire presentation from yesterday's kickoff event is below. The Press Release for the event can be accessed here.